Seven Words A Business Owner Can Never Afford To Use

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1) Try (the uncommitted’s word)
“We’re going to try to…”
Yoda – “Try not.  Do, or do not.  There is no try.”  Intentionality is a huge key to getting where you want to go.  When a business owner uses “try”, their escape route is clearly identified, and they have no intention of seeing things through, especially in the rough times.  Great business owners don't try, they do.

2) But (the victim’s word)
“This could have worked, but outside forces kept us from…”, or “But I don’t know how…”

“But” is the victomology word for business owners.  It keeps us from figuring things out and pushing through to victory.  Great business owners don’t use “but”.  They make lemonade with every lemon they’re given.

3) Can’t (the unbeliever’s word)
We "tried", but we "can't"...

Vision is critical.  If you don’t have clarity about where you’re going, you won’t believe you can get there.  Great business owners are too busy getting where they’re going to give in to “can’t”.  They’ll figure it out.

4) Settle [for] (the unmotivated’s word)
“Good enough.”  Great business owners don’t settle.  What was the passion that brought you into business in the first place?  Why would you allow circumstances to change your commitment to that passion?

Circumstances don’t make us who we are.  Our responses do.

5) Goals (the heroic activist’s word)
I have only one set of goals – my Lifetime Goals (things I can never check off as completed).  I have no goals for my business, only objectives and waypoints.  My business exists to serve me in getting to my Lifetime Goals, so each month, quarter, and year I set objectives and waypoints in my business to use my business to get there.   This keeps me from having false victories by beating a quarterly or annual “goal” and or false defeats by not having achieved them.  They are merely milestones or waypoints along the way to my Lifetime Goals.

Great business owners don’t get hung up on intermediary milestones – they are completely focused on getting to the end game, their only set of goals, the ones they can never check off – Lifetime Goals.

Conation – the will to succeed that manifests itself in single-minded pursuit of the goal.

6) Later (the thinker’s word)
Bad plans carried out violently many times yield good results. Do something.  The #1 indicator of success in early stage businesses is not how great your plan is, or how smart you are, or how much research you’ve done.  The #1 indicator of success is Speed of Execution.  Later never comes.

Three things changes us when we do them:
a)    Make a decision
b)    Put a date on it
c)    Go Public

Great business owners get an idea, move on it, and figure it out as they go, and they understand the value of going public with their intentions.

7) Alone (the “Rugged Individualist’s [proud loner’s] word)
Everything we do in life, from taking a spouse to joining a bicycling club has the element of “community” in it, except for business ownership.  Good luck with that one, you’re on your own.

There isn’t another place in society other than business ownership, where we have fully institutionalized the nonsense myth of the rugged individualist.  A friend of mine did a study on leadership and found that the single biggest indicator of success or failure was whether the leader had people close to them who the leader gave the authority and permission to call them on their actions.  John Wayne is dead.  We should have buried the rugged individualist with him.

Great business owners have Outside Eyes on their business all the time.

Which of these words are you using to run your business?  Here's a way to remember them -  “Try” to strike them from your vocabulary, “but” if you “can’t”, you can “settle” for only using a few and make a “goal” of getting rid of the rest “later”, when you’re “alone” and nobody’s watching.to be there.


About

Chuck Blakeman, founder of the Crankset Group - a worldwide business advisory, is the author of the #1 Rated Business Book of 2010 in the U.S., Making Money Is Killing Your Business.

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