Five Easy Ways to Add Value to Your Presentations

by Guest Expert

In a webinar last month, I spoke about how you could take a single idea, convert it into many information products, and use them to add value to your existing presentations, workshops, coaching sessions or other products (If you missed that webinar, watch the recording here).

1. On-line Courses

An on-line course is a series of "modules" you send by e-mail automatically to your participants. Create an on-line course for a workshop or keynote presentation, so participants get on-going reinforcement and education.

On-line courses are easy to create (because they are just e-mails) and deliver (because the delivery is handled by software). They are a really easy way to extend a one-off event into a longer program.

2. Access to You

Another easy way to add value is to offer clients and audiences individual access to you - for example:

  • Unlimited e-mail access for 90 days after a workshop.
  • Unlimited e-mail and phone access between coaching sessions.
  • Your private mobile phone number for all consulting clients.

Some people worry about being swamped with questions, but in fact it's usually the opposite. Usually, very few people take up your offer, and those who do will usually respect your time and really appreciate your advice. In any case, if you're worried about people abusing this privilege, you can set boundaries (90 days, 15-minute phone calls, etc.).

3. Webinars

Some experts try to make money from public webinars, but that's a difficult job unless you've got a strong database already or you're an experienced Internet marketer. A far better way to use webinars is to offer a planning webinar some time before a presentation or a support webinar some time after it (or both).

These webinars usually don't take as much preparation as stand-alone webinars, you're typically presenting them to a small group, and they are low-stress events because they are just one step in a bigger process.

When I run my workshops, I usually offer both types of webinar: A planning webinar 2-3 weeks before the workshop and a support webinar about two months after it.

4. Password-Protected Area

If you want to give your attendees and participants additional resources, put them on a password-protected area of your Web site, and give out the password at your event. You could choose to limit the access to, say, 90 days, or just offer access forever.

Of course, there are other ways to share these resources - such as putting them on a CD, DVD or memory stick. Sometimes those other methods are more appropriate than a password-protected area on your Web site. But don't overlook the perceived value of providing a password to your attendees.

You might want to create a full-blown membership site. But be careful you don't bite off more than you can chew! A membership site takes much more work - both now and in the future. Start with a simple password-protected page at first, and graduate to a membership site if you find there's a demand for it.

5. Membership Site

Yes, membership sites do work! If you really do know there's a demand, you know you can create on-going resources for members, and you have a strong network (of affiliates, suppliers and potential members), by all means go ahead and create a paid membership site.

Members pay a monthly or annual fee to join, but you can provide, say, 3 months free membership for workshop attendees and conference audiences. This is a high-value bonus for them, because you are (presumably) providing valuable resources for your other paying members. It also takes no extra work on your part, because you're providing these resources anyway, and these extra members just tag along for the ride.

Which of these could work for you?

So there you have it: My top five easy ways to add more value to your current offerings. Which of these could work for you? You don't have to do all five, but I'm sure you can add at least one of them to your business with very little effort.

 

Gihan Perera

www.gihanperera.com


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