Create Inspiration Not Perspiration in Your Performance Reviews

by Guest Expert

For some organizations, employees are now finding out what “bonus” or “incentive” payment they will receive based on 2014 financials.
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Figuring in the results are performance reviews dreaded by employees and their managers alike, no matter what level of the organization each is at. For most, personal and corporate goals have little in common. And so the quarterly or annual reviews are a largely unwelcome exercise that happens according to schedule to meet the rules.

But what if these mandated meetings began with meaningful discussions around the employee’s own dreams and desires? Let’s back up a bit. I would like to see more organizations helping individuals meet personal objectives, not just corporate objectives.

The pairing benefits both: the bottom line is a result of their ongoing behaviours.

However, an employee will not demonstrate the appropriate behaviors if they are not motivated to do so, and the best way to get those behaviours demonstrated is to make the performance review more personal in relationship to their dreams, not your corporate dreams.

Make the discussion about them Therefore, when you meet with each individual team member, lead the discussion to be about them and what they want out of life.

Do not discuss corporate goals or performance at this time.

From that discussion, ask them how they plan to realize their dreams, beyond career desires, and how you can be of assistance to them. Recognize their values and strengths at this point and if anything, build their self-esteem and encourage them to make their dreams a reality.

Now that you know where they want to go, how they are going to do it, and how you can be of help, do you think they will now be more motivated to assist you in reaching your corporate goals? I think so.

Next, you can introduce the corporate objectives and ask how they can contribute towards the accomplishment of them. Once again, recognize their values and strengths and align the objectives in that direction. Get to know them better. Check in often.

There should be no surprises when the mandated reviews come around. Keep in mind that people go to work to make money. However, it is not truly money that motivates them, it is the lifestyle dream that they have deep down inside.

Work is nothing but a stepping stone to help them get where they want to go. When they know where they want to go, they become more motivated to go to work.

Your job is to help your team members realize that each day of work brings them closer to the realization of one of their internal and personal dreams. That is the foundation to permanent self-motivation.

Self-motivation drives commitment. And commitment fuels engagement and results—a win-win for both the individual and the organization.

Bob Urichuck


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